Wayne Joseph’s Blog

Running with the Big Dog

Hilo Eye Doctor Stays Healthy & Fit

Hilo Optomitrist, Adolf Camblor

Hilo Optomitrist, Adolf Camblor


Have you ever wondered why ice cream comes in 31 or more flavors? Well, the answer is very simple, we all have different taste.
Such is the case for people who exercise. Some might prefer to run; others would rather walk, or swim, while others might want to paddle a canoe.
Exercise comes in all different forms and fortunately for us we have the opportunity to choose what best suits us.
Hilo Optometric Physician, Adolf Camblor, likes a variety of exercise in his weekly routine to keep him feeling healthy and strong.
Camblor’s exercise routine includes workouts on the elliptical machine, swimming in the ocean, stretching and playing tennis, all in the effort for staying in shape and being healthy in life.
“I like to cross train with exercises that don’t involve running,” Chamblor said. “I take a two hour lunch break almost every day and during this time I will usually run on an elliptical machine for at least a half hour along with another 15 to 30 minutes of calisthenics and stretching.”
“I like to use the elliptical machine because I can exercise my legs without the pounding that running induces.”
Camblor was born in Cuba and his family fled as political refugees in 1960 and made their home in South Carolina before settling in Miami, Florida.
“As a child I played a lot of baseball and recreational basketball,” he said. Camblor moved to Hilo in 1989 to start his optometry practice and can often be seen on the tennis courts during his lunch break or in the early evening.
“For me tennis is the ultimate game. You have to have good balance, quickness, proper technique, mental concentration, eye-hand coordination and endurance in a long match,” Camblor said.
Camblor “dabbled” in tennis during his college years and didn’t start playing league tennis until he moved to Hilo, where he now holds a 3.5 rating.
“I think what intrigued me about tennis so much is that I was so bad at it when I first took up the game,” he said. “I was able to become competent at most other sports much quicker than I was with tennis. I believe it was a personal challenge.”
Today Camblor competes in the United States Tennis Association adult league programs and finds that competition is a good motivator for keeping himself up on his training and skill levels. “Competition also forces me to develop a certain mental focus that can be very useful in everyday life,” he said.
Camblor also watches what he eats and stays close to a vegetarian diet. “I’m not very strict about my diet and will eat most foods in moderation,” he said. “I function best when I eat mostly fruits and soups with beans and veggies.”
This 56 year old optometrist looks 10 to 15 years younger and has the energy of a man half his age. “It seems that the more energy I put into a workout, the more energy I get back. Good physical fitness is the best health insurance that I can have,” Camblor said.
“No amount of health care or medicines is going to make up for physical illnesses caused by poor dietary habits and a lazy lifestyle.”
Camblor has discovered that “fountain of youth” by utilizing the benefits of regular physical exercise and good eating habits to make him a good role model for healthy living.
“I feel that along with being physically fit, it is just as important to be mentally, socially, and psychologically fit. Being productive and trying to always do the right thing creates a sense of well being that lets me sleep well every night,” Camblor said.
And Camblor’s hope for his future lies in his belief that he can remain competitive in tennis well into his 80’s.
One thing for sure is that Dr. Camblor is well invested in insuring a healthier, more productive life for years to come through regular physical exercise.

April 6, 2009 Posted by | Health and Fitness, Profiles | , , | Leave a comment

Kohala’s Naumes leads league in Shot & Discus

Jacob Edwards leads state in hurdles

Jacob Edwards leads state in hurdles

Kohala Senior, Julia Naumes, hits new heights

Kohala Senior, Julia Naumes, hits new heights

The defending Big Island Interscholastic Federation champion in the shot put, Kohala’s Julia Naumes, is leading the league in shot and discus this year.
Naumes, who moved to Kohala from Idaho three years ago, has made a name for herself through being on the Cowboy track & field team.
“My family moved here at the beginning of my sophomore year and track has helped me make the adjustment as I’ve made a lot of friends through sports,” Naumes said.
For the past four years Naumes has participated in the “Iron Wood Throwers Development Camp” in Spokane, Washington, which is a five day camp for some of the best track throwers in the nation.
“I’ve been coached by former Olympian, Wolfgang Schmidt, and the camp has taught me a lot about throwing the shot and discus,” she said. “At the camp they divide the shot/discus throwers into one group and the javelin/hammer throwers into another. It has provided me with a lot of knowledge about my sport.”
(Schmidt won the silver medal in the discus for East Germany during the 1976 Olympics and is a former World Record holder.)
Naumes currently ranks in the top ten in the state for both the shot and discus throws and she believes that she will be able to contend for the state title in May.
“The shot has always been my favorite event because it’s what I’ve been best at,” she said. “But I’m getting better at the discus and I’m hoping to win the BIIF championships in both events.”
Naumes has set her sights on being able to throw the shot 40 feet and the discus 120 feet by the end of the season in order to possibly win the state crown.
“I finished fourth in the state for shot my sophomore year and was sixth last year and I’m hoping to do better than that now that I’m in my senior year.”
Naumes has been recruited by several universities but has not signed a letter of intent. “I’m looking at where I can get the best financial package and right now I’m leaning towards Pacific University,” she said.
Another senior, Hilo’s Charles Clay, has his sights on breaking the 11 second barrier for the 100 meter dash.
Clay already has the third fastest time in the state for the 100, clocking 11.2 seconds in an earlier meet this season and has been focusing on developing more flexibility in order to lengthen his strides.
“I know I need more work in flexibility and that I need to work harder at practice,” Clay said. “My coach has put me in the 200 to help me work on my strides and hopefully that will make me faster.”
Clay also runs on the Viking 4×100 relay team at the anchor position and this past Saturday at Kamehameha he was placed on the 4×400 relay team and ran the third leg.
“I won the BIIF last year in the 100 and made it to states in both the 100 and 200,” he said. “But my primary focus is on doing a good job at the 100 as I need to get under 11 seconds.”
Clay has also been helpful to teammate Chance Spikes as the two works out during practice and have pushed each other during the meets. As a result Spikes ranks seventh in the state with a personal best, 11.22 seconds.
Kau’s Jacob Edwards comes into BIIF action as the number one hurdler in the state for both the 110 and 300 meter events.
This past Saturday Edwards served notice on the rest of the state that he will be a force in the triple jump as well as the Trojan junior hop-skipped-jumped his way to an impressive 45 feet 2 inch leap.
Kau coach, Bob Martin, believes that Edwards can excel in anything he tries. “Jacob is one of those kids that can do well in all of the six events that he runs,” Martin said. “By the end of this season he’ll be doing the triple jump beyond 46 feet and by next year he’ll be hitting 48 to 50 feet.”
Edwards agrees with his coach, saying that 46 feet in the triple is within his reach for this season. “I like doing the triple jump and the 110 hurdles, but there is still room for improvement in both,” he said.
“I need to the most work in my sprinting events as I need to get quicker in the starts and, of course, I need more conditioning. I can always use more conditioning,” Edwards said.
Edwards’ sister, Larissa, was a state champion in the hurdles and received a scholarship to run for the University of Wyoming where she is now rated in the top ten in her conference as a freshman.
Edwards is the defending BIIF champion in the 300 hurdles and the long jump and this year hopes to add the 110 hurdles and triple jump to his glowing championship resume.

April 6, 2009 Posted by | Events, High School Track & Field, Running on the Big Island | , , , , , | Leave a comment