Wayne Joseph’s Blog

Running with the Big Dog

Myths & Facts About Nutrition after 60

Myths & Facts About Food and Nutrition After 60

Myth: Once you reach your 60s, metabolism slows down and you need fewer nutrients.

Fact: While it’s true that older people typically require fewer calories than young adults, they actually need more of certain nutrients. The reason: As we age, our bodies are less efficient at making or absorbing some vitamins and minerals. The skin’s ability to generate vitamin D from sunlight declines. The body’s ability to absorb B12 also decreases.

“With age, the requirements for calcium, vitamin D, and B12 may all increase,” says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, senior scientist and director of the cardiovascular nutrition laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University.

Because seniors typically need fewer calories yet more of some key nutrients, they must take special care to eat nutrient-rich foods.

Myth: Older adults don’t need to worry about becoming overweight or obese.

Fact: Excess weight is a growing problem even among older Americans, says Lichtenstein. The culprit for people of all ages is simple: Consuming more calories than needed. Those extra calories are then stored as body fat. Excess body fat increases the risks of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Myth: If you don’t have a weight problem, you can eat whatever you like.

Fact: “Being overweight certainly increases the risk of chronic illnesses,” says Nancy Wellman, RD, past president of the American Dietetic Association. “But even if you’re slim, a poor diet can raise your risks of developing any of these chronic diseases.” Diets overloaded with saturated fat are linked to cardiovascular problems, for example. The bottom line: Following healthy nutrition advice is important whether you’re thin or fat.

Myth: If you don’t feel like eating, it’s OK to skip a meal.

Fact: Loss of appetite is a common complain among older adults, leading many to skip meals. That’s a bad idea for several reasons.

First, people who skip a meal because they’re not hungry can later gorge on high-calorie, nutrient-poor snacks between meals. Skipping meals can also cause blood sugar levels to fall too low; then when you do eat a big meal, they can surge too high. Skipping meals, paradoxically, can also suppress appetite. That can be a problem for older people who already suffer from a loss of appetite.

“The best advice is to always start your day with a healthy breakfast, since appetite is usually best in the morning,” says Wellman. “Then make sure you eat something at every meal time.”

February 28, 2010 - Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. Since the Credit Crunch began I have been hearing the same story every day, “I just can’t afford to buy fruit and vegetables because they are expensive to buy and they go off before I get a chance to eat them all.” We all know of the health benefits of fruit and vege but many of us still don’t get our 2 & 5 everyday.

    There is however good news! You can save a few dollars and still eat fruit and vegetables…

    Vegetables can be used as sides, main dishes and in dishes to help them stretch that little bit further. Grate some carrot and zucchini into pasta dishes or grate some cauliflower as some Not Rice.

    Comment by Nutrition | July 11, 2010 | Reply


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