Wayne Joseph’s Blog

Running with the Big Dog

Red Wine Sampling in upstate New York

Big Dog and Mrs Big Dog enjoy an afternoon of wine tasting in the Finger Lakes Region of upstate NY

A truly fun part of our vacation to upstate New York was stopping by the wineries and sampling the many varieties available at a nominal cost.  My personal favorite – Red Knight – moderately priced and full bodied. 

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of “good” cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.

While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That’s because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body.

Still, doctors do agree that something in red wine appears to help your heart, though it’s unclear just exactly what that “something” is. Researchers think antioxidants, such as flavonoids or a substance called resveratrol, have promising heart-healthy benefits.

Wine tasting fun!Antioxidants aren't the only substances in red wine that look promising. The alcohol in red wine also appears to be heart healthy. Find out what's known — and not known — about red wine and its possible heart-health benefits.How is red wine heart healthy?Research studies on the heart-health benefits of red wine have reported mixed results. Some studies show that red wine seems to have even more heart-health benefits than other types of alcohol, while other studies show that red wine isn't any better than beer, white wine or liquor for heart health. There's still no clear evidence yet that red wine is superior to other forms of alcohol when it comes to possible heart-health benefits.Making a purchase at Fulkerson Winery

The studies supporting red wine suggest antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. These antioxidants come in two main forms: flavonoids and nonflavonoids.

  • Flavonoids. These antioxidants are found in a variety of foods, including oranges, grape juice, apples, onions, tea and cocoa. Other types of alcohol, such as white wine and beer, contain small amounts, too, but red wine has higher levels.
  • Nonflavonoids. These antioxidants found in red wine have recently been of particular interest because they appear to help prevent arteries from becoming clogged with fatty blockages. However, these studies mostly involved mice — not humans. Resveratrol is the nonflavonoid that’s received the most attention from researchers.

Guess what's in the bag?Resveratrol in red wineResveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces "bad" cholesterol and prevents blood clots.Most research on resveratrol has been conducted on animals, not people. Research in mice given resveratrol has indicated that the antioxidant might also help protect them from obesity and diabetes, both of which are strong risk factors for heart disease. However, those findings were reported only in mice, not in people. In addition, to get the same dose of resveratrol used in the mice studies, a person would have to consume 100 to 1,000 bottles of red wine a day.Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting, both of which can lead to heart disease. More research is needed before it's known whether resveratrol was the cause for the reduced risk.Some companies sell supplements containing resveratrol. However, not enough is known about resveratrol's effects to endorse resveratrol supplements. Research into the potential heart-health benefits of resveratrol is continuing.My favorite winery

July 4, 2010 Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Trust of America’s Health – Obesity Rates

What parts of the country show the largest waistlines?

ADULT & CHILDHOOD OBESITY RATES:

An update on our collective waistline: The Trust for America’s Health has a new report out, with the blunt title “F as in Fat,” and the news isn’t good. The map above shows America’s obesity rates state by state. They hover in the 25 to 30 percent range. To put that in perspective, in 1991, no state had an obesity rate higher than 20 percent.

The report also notes the relationship between income and weight: “35.3 percent of adults earning less than $15,000 per year were obese compared with 24.5 percent of adults earning $50,000 or more per year.” Part of the problem there is that a salad costs more than a Big Mac. So that’s something to remedy. More cycling and walking would help, too.

Colorado has the lowest obesity rate at 19 percent. Apparently a year-round routine of uninterrupted mountain biking, rock climbing, and snowboarding more than offsets the side effects of the munchies.

Via Matt Yglesias

July 4, 2010 Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , , | Leave a comment