Wayne Joseph’s Blog

Running with the Big Dog

Arsenic found in RICE- Various Levels

Consumer Reports Investigation: Varying Levels of Arsenic Found In Rice and Rice Products Show Need for Federal Action

Concerning levels of known human carcinogen found in tests of more than 200 samples

YONKERS, NY — In Consumer Reports’ tests of more than 60 rice and rice products, inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen, was found in most of the name brand and other rice product samples. Levels varied, but were significant in some samples.

While there are federal limits for arsenic in drinking water, there aren’t many standards for arsenic in food. Earlier this year, Consumer Reports found worrisome levels of arsenic in apple and grape juices and called on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to set limits for arsenic in those juices. Based on its latest findings and analysis, Consumer Reports is asking the government to take additional steps, including urging the FDA to set limits for arsenic in rice and rice products.

“The goal of our report is to inform—not alarm—consumers about the importance of reducing arsenic exposure and offer actions they can take moving forward, such as limiting their rice consumption,” said Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D., Director of Safety and Sustainability at Consumer Reports. “Given what we now know about arsenic’s increasing role in contributing to multiple cancers and other serious health effects, the government needs to regulate arsenic in food. This includes setting standards and banning the practices that persistently deliver arsenic into our food and water supply.”

Consumer Reports Findings

Consumer Reports tested a range of rice products including infant cereals, hot cereals, ready-to-eat cereals, rice cakes, rice crackers, rice pasta, rice flour, and rice drinks and found varying, but measurable amounts of total arsenic—including inorganic and organic forms—in samples of almost every product tested. Inorganic arsenic is a known carcinogen that can cause bladder, lung, and skin cancer. Two organic forms measured—called DMA and MMA—are classified as possible carcinogens.

Consumer Reports’ study provides a snapshot of the market, with many products purchased in the New York metropolitan area and online this past spring. It is too limited to provide general conclusions about individual brands or categories of rice products but there were notable findings.

  • White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, and Texas generally had higher levels of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic than rice samples from elsewhere (India, Thailand and California combined).
  • Within tested brands offering brown and white rice versions, brown rice had higher average total and inorganic arsenic than their white rice counterparts.
  • Some brown rice samples were lower in arsenic compared to some white rice samples which may be explained by agricultural practices or geographic location.
  • Infant rice cereals and drink products also contained worrisome levels of arsenic. Consumer Reports advises that children under the age of 5 not be given rice drinks as part of their daily diet, similar to advice given in the United Kingdom regarding rice milk.
  • People who ate rice had arsenic levels that were at least 44 percent greater than those who had not according to Consumer Reports’ analysis of federal health data. Certain ethnic groups were more highly affected, including Mexicans, other Hispanics, and a broad category that included Asians.
  • Some food companies are concerned. And methods have been introduced to try to reduce levels of arsenic in products.

A chart identifying arsenic levels for each sample Consumer Reports along with complete report and analysis can be found online at www.ConsumerReports.org. The article “Arsenic in your food,” also appears in the November 2012 issue of Consumer Reports.

What the Government Should Do

Because Consumer Reports found significant levels of inorganic arsenic it believes more must be done to reduce dietary exposure.

  • The FDA should set limits for arsenic in rice products as well as apple and grape juices as Consumer Reports has previously requested.
  • The FDA should ban the feeding of arsenic-containing drugs to animals for that are used for the purpose of pigmentation, growth promotion, feed efficiency and disease prevention.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should phase out use of all arsenical pesticides.
  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the EPA should end the use of arsenic-laden manure as fertilizer for all foods and halt the feeding of manure to animals.

“Consumers may be surprised to learn that similar to antibiotics, arsenic-containing drugs can be fed daily to chickens, turkeys, and pigs to promote growth, lower the levels of feed required, prevent disease in healthy animals, and color the meat,” Dr. Rangan said. “The manure of treated animals ends up containing arsenic too. It can also be used to fertilize food crops, which effectively introduces arsenic back into the food supply. We are asking the government to stop the cycling of arsenic in our food and water.”

December 5, 2012 Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , , | Leave a comment

All Slim-Fast Canned Products Being Recalled

Slim Fast multi-million dollar mistake

All Slim-Fast ready-to-drink canned products are being recalled because of possible contamination with Bacillus cereus, a bacterium that may cause diarrhea and possibly nausea and/or vomiting.

Unilever United States, Inc. issued the voluntary recall in cooperation with the FDA.

“The probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote,” states a Unilever news release. Unilever says it issued the recall “out of an abundance of caution” based on its quality testing of Slim-Fast ready-to-drink (RTD) products in cans.

The recall involves all ready-to-drink Slim-Fast products sold in cans, regardless of flavor, “Best-By” date, lot code, or UPC number.

The recall doesn’t include any other Slim-Fast products, such as powdered shakes, meal bars, or snack bars.

The recalled cans are sold individually or packaged in paperboard cartons containing four, six, or 12 steel cans that are marked “11 FL OZ (325 mL)” each.

Unilever urges people to immediately discard Slim-Fast ready-to-drink products in cans and call the company at 800-896-9479 for a full refund. Unilever’s Consumer Services Center is open Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern time. A recorded message is available around the clock, every day.

Unilever states that it “is in the process of identifying and correcting the production issue, and will resume production and shipping of the product when the issue has been addressed and corrected.”

December 6, 2009 Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , , , | 1 Comment

FDA Approved Multaq may help Runners with Heart Rhythm Disorder

    Mass of bodies at Honolulu Marathon

    What happens if you’re a lifelong runner who suddenly develops a heart rhythm disorder?  For me it has been a rollcoaster ride with a variety of treatments and medications.

     It’s difficult to run when your heart is in cardiac arrhythmia, more commonly know as artrial fibrillation. So what are the choices when you’ve tried just about everything else?  Now comes a new drug called “multaq” which has only hit the consumer market a few weeks ago.

heart chart photoI’ve been asked by my doctor to try this new medication and wanted to know if anyone out there knows more than what I’ve found on the internet.

FDA Approves Multaq to Treat Heart Rhythm Disorder

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Multaq tablets (dronedarone) to help maintain normal heart rhythms in patients with a history of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (heart rhythm disorders). The drug is approved to be used in patients whose hearts have returned to normal rhythm or who will undergo drug or electric-shock treatment to restore a normal heart beat.

Multaq may cause critical adverse reactions, including death, in patients with recent severe heart failure. The drug’s label will contain a boxed warning, the FDA’s strongest warning, cautioning that the drug should=2 0not be used in severe heart failure patients.

“Multaq represents a therapeutic innovation for treatment of the heart rhythm disorder of atrial fibrillation,” said Norman Stockbridge, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

September 9, 2009 Posted by | Health and Fitness | , , , , | 9 Comments