Wayne Joseph’s Blog

Running with the Big Dog

Richardson Rough Water Swim complete results for 2012

# NAME – Last, First FIN SEX AGE AGE-GRP STICK # TIME
1 Rivera, Nakana   M 33 30-34 1 22.53
2 Kuwaye-Tamanaha, Ren   M 16 15-19 2 22.59
3 Cann, Kai’ea   M 20 20-24 3 23.14
4 Vargas, Noe   F 21 20-24 4 23.20
5 Weller, Kepa   M 18 15-19 5 25.04
6 Groff, Susan   F 46 45-49 6 25.11
7 Lincoln, Alex   M 20 20-24 7 25.42
8 Rutkowski, Teagan   F 14 10-14 8 27.33
9 Smith, Xanthe FINS F 48 45-49 9 27.43
10 Krzyska, Kiana   F 17 15-19 10 28.42
11 Perea, Brandon   M 21 20-24 11 28.43
12 Morton, Peter   M 59 55-59 12 28.44
13 Rivera, Aleja   F 36 35-39 13 29.36
14 Paulachak, Nicole   F 19 15-19 14 29.45
15 Kaetsu, Mark   M 27 25-29 15 30.06
16 Aragaki, Whitney   F 25 25-29 16 30.08
17 Ahlo, Mel   M 37 35-39 17 30.10
18 Hussey, Sara   F 38 35-39 18 30.15
19 Yamaki, Nolan   M 35 35-39 19 30.31
20 Cordell, Susan   F 50 50-54 20 30.57
21 Perea, Don   M 45 45-49 21 31.02
22 Tengan, Kaitlyn   F 12 10-14 22 31.04
23 Auwae, Makamae   F 12 10-14 23 31.06
24 Kawase, Ellis   M 20 20-24 25 31.15
25 Myers, Gary   M 59 55-59 25 31.18
26 Golden, Mark   M 53 50-54 26 31.20
27 Harmeling, Melissa   F 34 30-34 27 31.31
28 Alonzo, Elizabeth   F 25 25-29 28 31.34
29 McKeague, James FINS M 61 60-64 29 31.46
30 Junqueira, Elisa FINS F 49 45-49 30 31.51
31 Vogt, Roman FINS M 14 10-14 31 31.56
32 Mead, Lucas   M 32 30-34 32 31.58
33 Elias, Tamar FINS F 54 50-54 33 32.02
34 Smith, Brian   M 51 50-54 34 32.03
35 Haefner, Jim   M 65 65-69 35 32.05
36 Uchida, Norman   M 61 60-64 36 32.06
37 Boatwright, Denise   F 56 55-59 37 32.12
38 Varcak, Anastasia FINS F 25 25-29 38 32.14
39 Paschall, Edward Mack   M 49 45-49 39 32.15
40 Martin-Ekings, Sam   F 57 55-59 40 32.28
41 Yamaguchi, Griffith   M 56 55-59 41 32.31
42 Kerr, Lauren   F 19 15-19 42 32.36
43 Sprinkle, Joseph   M 49 45-49 43 32.38
44 Mott, Peter FINS M 65 65-69 44 32.42
45 Sugar, Steve   M 66 65-69 45 32.51
46 Owens, Chris   M 56 55-59 46 32.53
47 Sakovich, Bill   M 70 70+ 47 32.57
48 Marote, Chad   M 51 50-54 48 32.59
49 Carpenter, Kailani FINS F 51 50-54 49 33.05
50 Gregory, Chris   M 25 25-29 50 33.15
51 Machado, Diana   F 44 40-44 51 33.18
52 Oehlman, Richard FINS M 59 55-59 52 33.19
53 Wilson, Jan   F 60 60-64 53 33.23
54 Brown, Mikey   M 34 30-34 54 33.40
55 Kraus, Jim   M 64 60-64 55 33.44
56 Groff, Noelle   F 51 50-54 56 33.46
57 Donahoe, Mike FINS M 61 60-64 57 33.47
58 Laliberte, Emma   F 10 10-14 58 33.50
59 Randall, Jennifer   F 43 40-44 59 33.57
60 Janas, Dave   M 30 30-34 60 33.59
61 Laliberte, Roland   M 41 40-44 61 34.04
62 Kekela, Paul   M 28 25-29 62 34.05
63 Keane, Charles   M 59 55-59 63 34.07
64 Faridi, Fuzzy FINS M 52 50-54 64 34.09
65 Fairchild, Mike   M 52 50-54 65 34.10
66 Causey, Wendell   M 70 70+ 66 34.15
67 Girdner, Jeff   M 52 50-54 67 34.17
68 Moran, Lucinda FINS F 57 55-59 68 34.33
69 Waipa, Jarett   M 25 25-29 69 34.49
70 Lockwood, Star   F 58 55-59 70 34.56
71 O’Shaughnessy, Susan   F 57 55-59 71 35.07
72 Nishimoto, Kevin   M 27 25-29 72 35.17
73 Case, Jeffery   M 54 50-54 73 35.34
74 Serain, Calvin FINS M 38 35-39 74 35.39
75 Berryman, Joanne FINS F 59 55-59 75 35.42
76 Kamoku, Pomai FINS F 39 35-39 76 35.43
77 Soares, Lisa   F 50 50-54 77 35.48
78 Gapp, John   M 57 55-59 78 35.51
79 Berg, Daniel   M 57 55-59 79 35.52
80 Osier, Dennis   M 73 70+ 80 35.54
81 Valente, ‘Aiponokamoku FINS M 9 10-14 81 35.56
82 Laliberte, Liz FINS F 40 40-44 82 36.32
83 Serain, Daryl   M 60 60-64 83 36.46
84 Hanzawa, Trent   M 27 25-29 84 36.49
85 Evans, Alex FINS M 27 25-29 85 36.58
86 White, Kai   F 39 35-39 86 37.01
87 Lyle, Susanna   F 37 35-39 87 37.23
88 Dollwet, Roy   M 48 45-49 88 37.55
89 Mathews, Mo   M 85 70+ 89 38.01
90 Williamson, Kathy   F 54 50-54 90 38.10
91 Bahurinsky, Morgan   F 64 60-64 91 38.12
92 Patey, Robert   M 42 40-44 92 38.25
93 Luu, Clara   F 19 15-19 93 38.40
94 Fujii, Claudine FINS F 60 60-64 94 38.52
95 Ben, Mike   M 63 60-64 95 39.05
96 Eckart, Kanaipono   M 8 under 10 96 39.24
97 Serikaku, Brandy-Alia FINS F 26 25-29 97 40.19
98 Anthony-Case, Tia FINS F 28 25-29 98 40.23
99 Floro, Rod   M 37 35-39 99 41.11
100 Escobar, Michelle   F 43 40-44 100 41.13
101 Schlegelmilch, Annette   F 54 50-54 101 41.42
102 Makua, Kainoa   M 40 40-44 102 41.51
103 Brown, Bryan   M 20 20-24 103 42.41
104 Sutton, Jeff FINS M 55 55-59 104 42.56
105 Masuko, Heidi   F 35 35-39 105 44.04
106 Callo, Gerard   M 50 50-54 106 44.20
107 Beebe, Marina FINS F 74 70+ 107 45.41
108 Balingit, Nick FINS M 74 70+ 108 45.44
109 Serain, Margaret   F 61 60-64 109 45.48
110 Williams, Bob FINS M 73 70+ 110 46.16
111 Roehrig, Stan   M 73 70+ 111 46.43
112 Richardson, Patricia FINS F 72 70+ 112 46.49
113 Weller, Heanu   F 56 55-59 113 47.03
114 Roseguo, Daniel   M 21 20-24 114 47.10
115 Wong Yuen, Donna   F 49 45-49 115 47.19
116 Wela, Misae   F 57 55-59 116 48.37
117 Wela, Daniel   M 56 55-59 117 48.43
118 Patnode, Paul   M 72 70+ 118 49.30
119 Wilkins, Bob   M 76 70+ 119 49.50
120 Roseguo, Katherine   F 53 50-54 120 56.29
121 Miyashiro, Wayne   M 65 65-69 121 67.25

August 3, 2012 Posted by | Swimming in Hawaii | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Automotive Supply Center’s Balingit is a pharmacist of sorts

In doing this column for nearly ten years I had never met someone who calls himself a pharmacist, until recently when I met a 40 year old by the name of Lyle Balingit.

I’ve known his parents for a number of years and his dad , Nick, was a top running and swimming competitor in his heyday.

They say that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree and Lyle Balingit is a good example of a runner who has progressed over the years.

Balingit also has a great sense of humor like his father because he is a self described pharmacist of sorts.

“I’ve been working for Automotive Supply Center since 1995,” Balingit said.  “We meet different people every day in the shop where everyone wants the best price and part for their motorized vehicle.”

Balingit will find the right part for the customer in the shop and they will leave with a smile knowing the quality and the correct part is in their hands, according to Balingit.

“Stress hits me when nothing fits and every part seems to be wrong for that application,” he said.

So, Balingit considers himself a Pharmacist for cars as he works in the Sales of Parts.

Having an athletic father Balingit started in sports at age six by playing T-Ball and baseball and he also stayed fit by riding his bike everywhere.

“I remember riding my bike to Waiakea Uka Gym to meet up with friends for basketball games,” he said.

One of the earliest graduates of the then new Waiakea High School Balingit made a slow progression into running as he didn’t discover his love for the sport until two years ago.

“I guess you can say that I take after my dad,” he said.  “I’ve done a few half marathons (13.1 miles) and a handful of full marathons.”

Recently Balingit took on the challenge of running from Coconut Island in Hilo up to Cooper Center in Volcano Village, a distance of 31 miles.

“My longest race was the Hilo to Volcano Ultra Marathon,” he said.  “I did it to just challenge myself to see if I could do something that far.”

Balingit has discovered, through running, the individuality that comes with loving the sport.

“I like the challenge, to see how far I can get, and how I can push myself,” Balingit said.  “I also like meeting up with my elementary buddies, Nick Ayho and Allan Leite, for our weekend runs.”

Balingit realizes what running can do for his body and sense of well being.

“I want to keep active and healthy so that I can live a life, medication free,” he said.  (And that coming from a pharmacist)  “I plan on living a long, happy life and to watch my children Logan and Lainie, as well as my nephews and nieces grow up.”

Balingit is considered a health runner, as opposed to being a competitive one.  His motivation for exercise comes from wanting to be healthy and not from wanting to win medals or recognition.

His training schedule for health allows him to run, on average, 10 to 18 miles during the work week, and when in training for a marathon he will add a long run of 18 miles on either Saturday or Sunday.

“My favorite race is the Big Island International Marathon because I live in Pepepeekeo and the course starts a few yards from my house,” Balingit said.

Having a marathon start right outside enables Balingit to run on the marathon route whenever he is able.

“I have to take advantage of running on that scenic course,” he said.  “The race is so challenging that if I start too fast on the hills in the first eight miles it will make it harder for me to enjoy the second half of the race.”

The Big Island Marathon brings runners past Richardson Beach Park  where Balingit finds time to meditate. 

“That beach run, near mile twenty, allows me to get into a mental zone of some kind where I am able to find inner strength,” he said.

Balingit and his family also realizes the value of nutrition and they will eat a variety of healthy meals.

“We try to watch what we eat so we do a lot of fruits and vegetables along with pasta dishes and stir fries and fresh fish,” he said.

But with most things that are good for us, exercise at times does not come easily for Balingit.

“There are times that pain comes with running and times that my thigh feels like a man kicked the heck out of it,” Balingit said.  “I just can’t walk as it is so painful.”

Balingit remembers a marathon where nearing the end of the race it became a difficult struggle to continue.

“One marathon, around mile twenty three, I swear, a golf ball size knot was behind my knee,” he said.

It was during that race that the tough Balingit went through an extreme negative scenario of  thoughts before coming to a positive conclusion.

“I remember telling myself, what the heck do I do?.” He recalled.  “Keep going, don’t quit?  Yell!!”

Balingit ended up massaging the knot while running, and he finished the race, despite the excruciating pain.

Through running this automotive pharmacist has learned much about himself and his ability to push harder.

Running is a sport where people discover who they are and what they have inside of them.  If you succeed in your goals or if you complete a marathon you have the satisfaction of knowing that you did it on your own.

Lyle Balingit has learned much about himself and will continue to learn with the many more years’ worth of challenges ahead of him.

And someday should you happen to see a lifelong learner come jogging through the streets of East Hawaii remember to smile, say “woof” and never shy away from “Running with the Big Dog.”

April 24, 2012 Posted by | Profiles | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Big Island FCU, Nicki Aguinaldo, Raising the bar on Goal Setting

Nicki Aguinaldo

For most of my life I have been setting goals and raising the bar each time I’ve achieved that goal.  It is a good way to challenge my boundaries and to get out of my comfort zone.

“Our subconscious mind can be compared to a garden,” Dr. Joseph Murphy said.  “If we leave it unattended, the weeds will grow wild.  Goal setting is a great destroyer of those weeds.”

For Hilo’s Nicki Aguinaldo raising the bar and reaching higher has become part of her everyday routine.

“I like to see what I am capable of doing,” Aguinaldo said.  “Sometimes I don’t reach my goals, but I’ll just try harder the next time around.”

Aguinaldo, the Vice President of the Loan and Collection Department at the Big Island Federal Credit Union in Hilo recently set another goal as she ran the Big Island International Half Marathon a little more than a week ago.

“The night before the half marathon I was talking with my father-in-law, Nick Balingit, and I told him I wanted to run the 13.1 mile race in 2 hours and 30 minutes,” she said.

“My father-in-law is an active runner and he encourages us to live a healthy life and to do the best we can in everything we do,” Aguinaldo said.

Balingit and his wife Josie can often be seen walking laps around Liliuokalani Gardens and Nick is a regular at various swimming events, including the Richardson Rough Water Swim.

“My in-laws are often there for us as they help watch our kids when we train,” Aguinaldo said.  “Nick came to the finish line to watch us finish and even though I didn’t reach my goal, I finished in 2:48, he was still impressed.”

Aguinaldo graduated from Hilo High School in 1992 and did very little running prior to starting a family.

“I ran track during intermediate school and ran during my first year of high school,” she said.  “I have a good family support system which encourages me to try my best.”

Every other day Aguinaldo will meet up with friends, Crystal Nicolas and Stacie Mandaloniz, for a run of three to five miles.

“My in-laws will watch the kids, Logan 9 and Lainie 5, so that I can get in a run right after work with my friends,” she said.

Aguinaldo will try to watch what her and her family eats, but is often side tracked with other temptations.

“At home we’ll eat a lot of salads, chicken and fish,” she said.  “I try to stay away from sweets as much as possible but it’s hard when you work in an office with ladies because we are always snacking.”

What’s even more interesting about Aguinaldo is that when she first started trying to get into shape she could barely run a mile and now she is doing half marathons.

“When I first started running I could barely run a mile without stopping,” she said.  “But I welcomed the challenge of pushing myself harder each time.”

Aguinaldo wanted to test her limits as she has close family members, including life partner Lyle Balingit, that have run several half and full marathons and she wanted to experience the ups and downs of training.

“The best way for me to feel what others are going through when they train for a long distance run is for me to try it myself,” she said.  “What’s great about my family is that everyone is so encouraging and provides me with a great support base.”

For Aguinaldo she has learned the benefits of doing a long run and has found it to be a good way to reduce stress.

“While running I get to clear my mind, it’s just me and the song playing on my iPod,” she said.

In writing this story I was reminded of what the great Los Angeles Dodger first baseman, Steve Garvey said, concerning setting goals.

“You have to set goals that are almost out of reach.  If you set a goal that is attainable without much work or thought, you are stuck with something below your true talent and potential,” Garvey said.

Thirty seven year old Nicki Aguinaldo continues to set the bar higher for herself and doesn’t allow not reaching it the first time to interfere with trying it again.

“I plan on doing one more half marathon by the end of this year and the goal is to run it with a better time,” she said.

“I’d also like to do at least one 5K (3.1 miles) with my two kids,” she said.

Asked if she would ever try to tackle the full, 26.2 mile, marathon, she replied, “No, but never say never.”

Nicki Aguinaldo is but one of the many hard working, family oriented members of our community that continue to set goals in order to live a more healthy and productive lifestyle.

I’d be willing to beat that at her next half marathon she will reach her goal of 2 hours and 30 minutes and if she doesn’t she will be trying it again for a third time with a never ever giving up attitude.

There is much to learn from this young woman.

And someday should you happen to see a happy, goal setting, retired teacher doing laps up and down Shower Drive remember to smile, say “woof” and never shy away from “Running with the Big Dog.”

Email the Big Dog at waiakeabigdog@aol.com.

March 29, 2011 Posted by | Profiles | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment